3 Creepy Hotels in the United States

Stanley HotelGhosts seem to be everywhere: hospitals, schools, offices, train stations, in your closet, under your table, behind you, on your shoulders. But many ghosts seem to be at-home in hotels. If you’re a ghost hunter or if you just want to experience how it’s like to see a ghost, then go get your stuff and request a room at these creepy hotels:

Celebrity ghosts at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel

You have to be a minor celebrity or a guest at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to see Marilyn Monroe’s ghost. She reputedly haunts the super exclusive Tropicana nightclub. No need to worry if you don’t have access to this club reserved for VIPs. You may catch Monroe’s restless spirit near the mezzanine-level gift shop.

If Monroe’s ghost pulls a no-show, take heart. There are other celebrity ghosts roaming around the hotel. Many guests have claimed to hear Montgomery Clift’s trombone playing in the 9th floor hallways. If you’re a fan, you should request Room 928. But be prepared to be shocked for the room rates.

Spooking Stephen King at the Stanley Hotel

You think nothing frightens Stephen King? Well, during an overnight stay at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, he is said to have been spooked by the ghost of a hotel maid. The belief is that the maid died in his room, 217. Scaring the Master of Horror is a big deal. His experience inspired him to write his hit novel, The Shining.

The hotel sits on the land originally under the possession of the British Fourth Earl of Dunraven who was driven out by legal battles and irate locals. This paved the way for the 1909 opening of the Georgian-style hotel. The bitter Lord Dunraven terrorizes guests in Rooms 401, 407 and 418. If you want to be possessed by an evil entity and speak in tongues, then request Room 412.

A girl, a mother, and a soldier at the Logan Inn

The fright is on as soon as you check in at the Logan Inn in New Hope, Pennsylvania. Built in 1722, the inn and its ghosts are legendary in the Colonial-era town considered by many as the country’s most haunted. Here, you may see the ghost of a girl who wanders around the parking lot or a Revolutionary War soldier who marches to the beat of his phantom drum. Request Room 6 if you want to experience Emily’s (a former inn owner) petrifying tricks with the heater and your luggage.

 
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