Urim and Thummim

Urim and ThumminUrim and Thummim are known to be a scrying tool, or the process of divination in early times. There is reference to their use by early Hebrews (usually Israelites) to reveal the will of God on topics of contestation.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is said to employ Urim and Thummim to translate ancient manuscripts. The Book of Mormon also has records of its use.

In the teachings of Judaism, The Urim and Thummim were appended to the High Priest’s Breastplate, along with a parchment bearing God’s Holy name, the Tetragrammaton. This caused the breastplate to glow, and thus ‘transmit’ God’s word to the children of Israel.

Masonic Legend refers to Urim and Thummim as part of artifacts originally housed in Solomon’s Temple.

In Jewish legend, a Hebrew artifact consisted of twelve brightly colored gems contained on a breastplate, two of which were Urim and Thummim. This artifact was highly prized by priests.

The precise nature of Urim and Thummim is highly debated, though it is suggested by some scholars that they are two crystals. The Hebrew Bible however, states that "stones used for "an" Urim and Thummim were kept in the breastplate of Aaron, the brother of Moses."

Recently however, scholars have said that the Urim and Thummim didn’t refer to a device, but rather a procedure of divination or casting lots, employing the use of certain stones or jewels.

Some evidence suggests that Urim and Thummim were used to provide answers to "yes or no" questions, depending on how an oracle would use them, such as establishing a person’s guilt or innocence.

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